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Overview Taught modules Research project People Contact details How to apply Entry requirements and costs FAQs

Overview

From the start of the 2011/12 academic year the MSc in Cognitive Neuroscience will no longer be a collaborative programme with Birbeck college.  It will be run entirely at UCL with the course content and modules remaining the same.

The MSc in Cognitive Neuroscience is a degree programme offered by the Division of Psychology and Language Sciences.  The programme focuses on the relationship between the mind and the brain in healthy and brain-damaged individuals. Students will learn about the ideas, methodology, and current state of knowledge in cognitive neuroscience, a burgeoning field of study into the neural bases of mental processes. UCL is among the principal research centres in the world in this area and offers an ideal environment to study cognitive neuroscience. As a student on the programme, you will become part of this vibrant academic community.

The programme consists of eight taught modules (worth 15 credits each) and an empirical research project (worth 60 credits). During the taught modules, you will learn what cognitive neuroscience is, how mind-brain relations can be studied, what techniques are currently available to study brain structure and function, what is currently known about the neural underpinnings of a number of mental processes, and how mind-brain relations change across the life span and after neurological damage. The taught modules include case demonstrations of brain-damaged patients, insights into 'virtual' lesion approaches (transcranial magnetic and direct current stimulation), and experience with functional neuroimaging techniques. During the research project, you will be given the opportunity to collaborate with a local expert on a cognitive neuroscience experiment, and contribute to this exciting and rapidly developing field.

 

SEMINARS and EVENTS

 

Monday 19 Jan
Elliot Freeman

Dept of Psychology, City University London
Individual differences in multisensory integration and timing


Monday 26 Jan
Chris Miall

School of Psychology, University of Birmingham
The cerebellum as an adaptable predictor, for movement and cognition


Monday 02 Feb
Ines Jentzsch

School of Psychology & Neuroscience, University of St Andrews
Effects of expertise, normal aging and psychological illness on our ability to monitor for processing conflicts and errors


Monday 09 Feb
Sam Gilbert

Executive Functions Research, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, UCL
Outsourcing cognitive control to the external environment: the role of metacognition


Monday 16 Feb
Charlotte Stagg

Head of Physiological Neuroimaging Group, FMRIB, University of Oxford
Multimodal approaches to understanding the role of inhibition in human motor plasticity


Monday 23 Feb
David Soto

Dept of Medicine, Imperial College London
Working memory, attention and conscious awareness


Monday 02 Mar
Christian Doeller

Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition & Behaviour, Nijmegen
Mapping memories


Monday 09 Mar
Erin Heerey

School of Psychology, Bangor University
Competition and co-operation in social interactions


Monday 16 Mar
Spas Getov

Awareness Research Group, Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, UCL
Evaluating social threat without awareness


TMS Course
 

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